Private


Integrative Counselling

Integrative therapy or integrative counselling is a combined approach to psychotherapy that brings together different elements of specific therapies. Integrative therapists take the view that there is no single approach that can treat each client in all situations. Each person needs to be considered as whole and counselling techniques must be tailored to their individual needs and personal circumstances.

Integrative counselling maintains the idea that there are many ways in which human psychology can be explored and understood – no one theory holds the answer. All theories are considered to have value, even if their foundational principles contradict each other – hence the need to integrate them.

The integrative approach also refers to the infusion of a person’s personality and needs – integrating the affective, behavioural, cognitive, and physiological systems within one person, as well as addressing social and spiritual aspects. Essentially, integrative counsellors are not only concerned with what works, but why it works – tailoring therapy to their clients and not the client to the therapy.


Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is one of the few forms of psychotherapy that has been scientifically tested and found to be effective in hundreds of clinical trials for many different disorders. It is a way of talking about how you think about yourself, the world and other people and how what you do affects your thoughts and feelings.

CBT can help you to change how you think (‘Cognitive’) and what you do (‘Behaviour’). These changes can help you to feel better. Unlike some of the other talking treatments, it focuses on the ‘here and now’ problems and difficulties. Instead of focusing on the causes of your distress or symptoms in the past, it looks for ways to improve your state of mind now.

Patients learn specific skills that they can use for the rest of their lives. These skills involve identifying distorted thinking, modifying beliefs, relating to others in different ways, and changing behaviours.


EMDR

If something traumatic has happened to you (whether it be a car accident, abuse or something seemingly less significant like being humiliated), the memory of your experience may come crashing back into your mind, forcing you to relive the original event with the same intensity of feeling – like it is taking place in the present moment.

These experiences that pop into your awareness may present themselves as either flashbacks or nightmares, and are thought to occur because the mind was simply too overwhelmed during the event to process what was going on.

As a result, these unprocessed memories and the accompanying sights, sounds, thoughts and feelings are stored in the brain in ‘raw’ form, where they can be accessed each time we experience something that triggers a recollection of the original event.

While it isn’t possible to erase these memories, the process of Eye Movement Desensitisation Reprocessing (EMDR) can alter the way these traumatic memories are stored within the brain – making them easier to manage and causing you less distress.

What is EMDR?

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is an integrative psychotherapy approach that has been extensively researched and proven effective for various treatments. EMDR is a set of standardized protocols that incorporates elements from many different treatment approaches.

Today, the therapy is used to treat a wide range of psychological difficulties that typically originate in trauma, such as direct or indirect experiences of violence, accidents or natural disaster. EMDR therapy is also used to treat more prolonged, low-grade distress that originates in shock or loss in adult life and/or issues experienced during childhood. The experiences outlined above often lead to a post-traumatic stress disorder diagnosis, for which EMDR has been recommended by the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE).

Goals of EMDR

The goal of EMDR therapy is to properly process these traumatic memories, reducing their impact and helping clients to develop coping mechanisms. This is done through an eight-phase approach to address the past, present, and future aspects of a stored memory, requiring clients to recall distressing events while receiving bilateral sensory input, including:

  • side to side eye movements
  • hand tapping
  • auditory tones

Increasingly, EMDR therapy is also being used for the treatment of other issues including:

  • depression
  • performance anxiety
  • OCD
  • phobias and fears
  • anxiety
  • low self-esteem

To date, EMDR therapy has helped millions of people of all ages.


Coaching

It is our privilege to support individuals and organisations to improve and personally develop as professionals. Our gift is sharing the unique power of coaching – facilitating our clients to reach their full potential. Our reward is doing something that allows us to enjoy these remarkable journeys with our clients. As our success is your success.

What is coaching?

Coaching focuses on a person’s present, in order to help them create actionable strategies for achieving specific goals in one’s personal and work life and act towards the future. The emphasis in a coaching relationship is on action, accountability. It’s our experience and expertise that enables us to know when to look at the past because it informs the present, as well as in order to help distinguish limiting belief systems.

Personal/Life Coaching: can be described as a collaborative solution-focused, results-orientated and systematic process in which the coach facilitates the enhancement of work performance, life experience, self-directed learning and personal growth of the coachee.

Speciality/Niche Coaching: as with personal coaching, the coach addresses one particular aspect of a person’s life e.g. stress, career, or the coach is focused on enhancing a particular section of the population e.g. doctors, youths.

Group Coaching: as for personal coaching, the coach is working with a number or individuals either to achieve a common goal within the group, or create an environment where individuals can co-coach each other.


Family Mediation

Family Mediation is the preferred method of helping you resolve conflict on all issues surrounding separation, divorce or dissolution of civil partnership.

Whilst it aims to prevent family disputes by reach agreements freely negotiated, it seeks to help you and your family restore communication, understanding and trust.

It is a voluntary and confidential process which helps you reach joint decisions without the use of courts.  It offers you a safe, neutral place where you and your ex-partner can meet with an impartial mediator to work out plans for the future.

As Mediators we do not tell you what to do but help you look at different options for sorting things out, so that you reach your own agreements about all aspects of your separation, divorce or dissolution.


I’ve never experienced therapist like David, with him I had more of a feeling that I was in control of my own recovery. It felt far more positive and as if I was actually achieving something.